Why Staying Inside is Bad for Your Health

For decades now, the evolution and spread of home electronics has encouraged people to spend more time inside. With the growth of remote working and the gig economy, more and more people are spending their entire working lives indoors. When taken to extremes, staying indoors can exacerbate a wide variety of health problems. Whether you are more vulnerable to mental or physical problems, the benefits of getting outdoor time deserve adequate recognition.

During late fall and winter, it is particularly important to find time for outdoors relaxation. These are the times of year when people naturally tend to stay inside. With the rise of central heating and other modern amenities, it has become far too normal for people to stay rooted indoors all year long. Although modern homes are designed to circulate air, it is all too common circulation systems to work poorly. As a result, indoor air can quickly become stale and unhealthy. The cheaper ventilation systems most people use can become clogged fairly easily. During the times of year when people generally keep their windows closed, indoor air can build up dangerously high amounts of dust, allergens and germs. When you breath stale indoor air, you never know what kinds of disgusting things you might be ingesting into your body. Mold and cockroach dander are two of the unhealthy substances that might linger in your home’s air without your knowledge.

Opening windows and using free-standing air filtration systems are two proactive steps you can take to improve the indoor air quality in your home. Spending time outdoors is an even cheaper and more effective way to improve the air you breathe and reduce your chances of illness. If you live in a built-up area with lots of traffic, you might have to walk or drive an appreciable distance to find a pristine outdoor area where you can breathe easily. Never doubt that making an effort to enjoy the outdoors is almost always a fine idea.

Crucially, staying indoors for long periods of time can negatively impact your mental health. Cabin fever is a very real phenomenon that occurs when people become cooped up and experience mental stress. While it is typically associated with winter time, this type of stress can impact people at any time of year. Symptoms of cabin fever can range from mild to debilitating. There is no hard and fast rule for how much outdoor time you’ll need in order to avoid cabin fever. If you are generally happy and joined with people you love spending time with, you could potentially spend long periods of time indoors without damaging mental effects. However, these ideal situations are all too rare and fleeting. Most people experience anxiety and phobias as part of their ordinary lives. To play it safe, acquire a warm jacket so you you can spend time outside each and every day, all year long.

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