Is Gluten-Free Wheat on the Way?

Whether you suffer from celiac disease or a sensitive digestive system, gluten is a common enemy. This widespread ingredient in breads and pastas creates intestinal issues for some people. Reactions may be so severe that people seek out gluten-free foods. Gluten, however, performs the beneficial job of creating texture and cohesiveness in breads. It’s also derived from wheat plants. Many gluten-free products line the shelves today, but wheat-based products aren’t part of the line up. Gluten-free wheat may be on its way to satisfy many consumers.

Wheat-Based Starch Allowed

When most people see the word “starch,” they immediately think of cornstarch. This association is viable because most uses of this word within ingredient lists are regulated to mean corn-based substances. In the past few years, some foods marked as gluten free now have wheat-starch descriptions. This starch comes from pure plants, but it’s processed to the point of having very little gluten. If you’re wondering about wheat-based bread that’s certified as gluten free, it’s on its way.

Gluten Free Doesn’t Indicate Purity

Gluten-sensitive or allergic people are well-aware of the ingredients to look out for during a grocery trip. Any mention of a wheat-based product is grounds to put the item back on the shelf. Being gluten free, however, doesn’t mean that the product is entirely void of this substance. It merely indicates that there’s less than 20 parts per million of gluten ingredients. With this fact in mind, gluten-free wheat-based products are possible.

Trace Impacts

There are some concerns in the food industry that point out the negative impacts of gluten from trace accumulations. That 20-PPM value may not be achievable with so many ingredients adding up to more gluten in every bite. Product managers are currently working on the trace-element concerns so that gluten-free items are still healthy.

Hybridizing Plants at the Farm Level

It may not be necessary to process gluten out of plant-based products with hybridizing occurring at some farms. Researchers are altering plant characteristics to develop crops that have little or no gluten at all. Use these plants for bread and pasta production while still adhering to the gluten-free label.

Every person will have a unique reaction to gluten when they’re sensitive to it. Unless you’re diagnosed with an autoimmune disease, the best way to find out if a food is agreeable with your system is to try a small portion. Be your own advocate so that you can discover new foods as they emerge in the marketplace. Gluten-free wheat may be on the way so be ready to try it as an open-minded person.

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